The Faces of Faces

“Nobody has the time to be vulnerable to each other.”

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6 Responses to The Faces of Faces

  1. Stevie says:

    Stunningly beautiful faces, every one. Real people. And in their realness, such beauty.

    Sheila, I’m just thinking about Gena Rowlands and about “Broadway: The Golden Age,” how Gena talked about going with John Cassavetes to see three or four movies in a row, jumping from theater to theater all night long. I’m struck with how it’s really all about faces, isn’t it? Acting, interacting, living – a plate with two eyes, a nose and a mouth on it, turned toward other plates. Putting out, pulling in, connecting or not connecting. To be Gena and John in the 40’s, intensely studying theater all day, seeing huge faces on the screen all night (and what faces they were on the screen in the 40’s!), and having each other’s faces to explore in their infinite variety – –

    I’m just having an existential moment here.

    xxx

  2. red says:

    Stevie – God, I love your comment.

    It really is mindblowing.

    I’ve seen this movie so many times – and it really is startling, how he uses closeups … even of people who aren’t the “stars” of the thing. He almost goes up people’s noses, he wants to get so close. Marvelous stuff – and yes, people are revealed, in all their humanity and complexity … It’s really an incredible film. I love it more with each passing year.

    Truly amazing to me that both Rowlands and Lynn Carlin were pregnant during filming. Especially Carlin who has that intense scene where she overdoses and Seymour Cassel tries to snap her out of it. Amazing stuff.

  3. red says:

    Oh, and you should be receiving a package from me in the next couple of days. Look for it!!

  4. De says:

    That last picture is the definition of beauty!

  5. When I saw “Faces”, it was during the time my parents were getting a divorce. I had resisted going to see it, but one of my friends convinced me. I was a high school senior at the time. I found the film to be the catharsis I needed to get me out of my depressed state. A couple of years later, as an NYU film student, I got to meet John Cassavetes with some other film students in conjunction with “Husbands”. I told him about my experience seeing “Faces”. His response was to give me a hug.

  6. red says:

    Oh Peter – what a beautiful story. I am sure your comments meant the world to him. So nice.